Gudas, Radko

NHL Game Night: 10-8-13 Lightning at Sabres

Lightning win their first mini-segment of the season.

BUF-2 (OT)

Ben Bishop allowed 2 goals on 23 shots for the victory.

First Period

Second Period
11:09 BUF Hodgson (1), (Vanek, McBain)(PP)
13:35 TB Johnson (1), (Hedman, Palat)
18:34 BUF McBain (1), (Hodgson, Vanek)(PP)

Third Period
5:43 TB Purcell (2), (Malone, St Louis)(PP)

1:50 TB Killorn (1), (Brewer, Filppula)

Alex Killorn was the game's second star. Kudos to Buffalo's media for the homer choice to take 2 star selections in a losing cause. Kudos also to NBC Sports Network scrunch-faced-creep Keith Jones for calling the Lightning a "weak sister" team after the game. Keep sleeping on the Lightning while they gain experience and settle in. It's all good.

Buffalo's not good, so the Lightning needed to get the 2 points and needed to look pretty good doing it. And, for the most part, I thought they did. They outshot Buffalo 34-23 and had the lion's share of the scoring chances. The defense was more loosey goosey than in the first two games, and I'm sure Cooper will remind his young team not to play down to his competition by letting off their defensive system. Still, 2-1-0 to complete this murderous opening road trip is really good, and now they get 7 straight at home for their second mini-segment of the season. It's not an easy slate of opponents, overall, but if they come out of that over .500 then they'll stay in the hunt. My theory, for this season, is if the Lightning are in the hunt in early January they're going to be dangerous. Cooper will have everyone fully programmed and ready to rock by that point, and they'll be a threat. Getting through the first half of the season alive with such an inexperienced team is the trick. 3 games in, so far so good. Ben Bishop looking solid helps that out a lot. A LOT.

Radko Gudas was +1 with 9 penalty minutes, 2 hits, and 2 blocked shots in 21:35. His ice time went up with Sustr getting a night off, and I thought his game was his worst of the first 3 of the season. I like that he stuck up for Filppula in the First Period, but I thought he got a little lost at time in his d-zone and got de-jocked for a scoring chance at one point. He'll have games like this while he figures out how to be an NHLer.

Tyler Johnson had a goal and was +1 with 4 shots and 62% on draws in 14:29. In case you didn't believe Bolt Prospects when we said he had an NHL laser shot, please gander at the tape from his goal tonight. Zap.

Killorn had the winner and was +1 with 4 shots in 18:14. The line shuffling and lesser opponent allowed Alex to possess the puck more than in the first 2 games, and he paid the price to win it in overtime. Took a hit to get it in the zone and then showed ridiculous patience to switch to his backhand on the eventual finish. I think there might be some Chris Drury in Killorn. He scores big goals.

Ondrej Palat had a helper and was +1 with 4 shots and 3 hits in 14:08. That's the most comfortable Palat's looked so far this year. It helps when you're playing a bunch of the same guys to played against in Norfolk and Syracuse on the Sabres roster.

Pierre-Cedric Labrie had 2 penalty minutes and 1 hit in 8:53. Labrie and the 4th line were again, period-to-period, the most consistent Lightning line. You can count on Labrie, Thompson, and Crombeen, despite their athletic shortcomings, to generate forecheck and put some pressure on the opposing defense. When your 4th line can accomplish that for you, it's such a huge asset for a team because you don't have to lean on the other lines as much on nights they don't have it as much. Evidently Buffalo was chirping at Labrie all night about his skating or whatever. Hate to tell Buffalo, but Labrie's line was playing in their end all night long. So if Labrie sucks and his skating sucks, guess how much you clowns in Buffalo must stink if Nacho and his crew keep pinning you down in your end? Success is the best revenge.

Box score and extended statistics from

NHL Game Night: 10-5-13 Lightning at Blackhawks

Positive results are huge for a young team.

CHI-2 (SO)

Ben Bishop was tremendous, stopping 37 of 39 shots before blanking 3 of 3 shooters (and what shooters they are when you play Chicago) in the shootout for the win. There's your number one goaltender, folks.

First Period

Second Period
0:59 CHI Kane (2), (Bickell, Hjalmarsson)
9:14 CHI Saad (2), (Leddy, Crawford)(PP)

Third Period
10:08 TB St Louis (1), (Stamkos, Carle)
11:51 TB Purcell (1), (St Louis, Stamkos)(PP)


TB- Filppula

Martin St. Louis and Ben Bishop were the game's first and third stars. Bishop would've been my first, second, and third stars of the game. Recall what I wrote after the Boston game: you need your goaltender to be a reason you steal games against superior opponents on the road in a spot like this. That's what Bishop did tonight. He was strong, poised, and confident, giving the Lightning time and the opportunity to come back and get the 2 points.

It took 5 periods of hockey, but the Lightning offense finally started to play with some energy in the Third Period. You could see it incrementally coming over the course of those 5 periods, but I think now in Buffalo in the next game out you'll see the early season fog is over. It may have been a product of guys thinking a bit and being tentative because they're settling into Cooper's defensive system, but I think the confidence they'll get from knocking off the Stanley Cup champs will go a long way to getting it going from here on out. You cannot overestimate the value of tonight's win. Looking at the schedule, I felt if the Lightning could steal 2 points out of Boston or Chicago, it'd be a huge bit of positive reinforcement of their work in camp, and there it is.

Much will be said about Chicago outshooting Tampa Bay 39-16 and out-chancing the Lightning by about a 3-1 margin, but I encourage you to compare how the Lightning did defensively with the tape of how Washington looked against the Blackhawks in their opener. Like in Boston, there was way more structure and poise defensively, and if they can get more offensive puck possession from here on out they'll be in excellent shape. Take that goofy bounce off the glass away, and the Lightning would've held Chicago to 1 goal tonight. Yeah, Bishop had to play really well to make that happen, but still. That's not too shabby for a team that has stunk to high heavens defensively the past 2 seasons.

Kudos and cookies tonight for Matt Carle and the 4th line, by the way. Carle was +1 in 24:38 tonight with a helper and was just as solid as you could want as a veteran d-man. And, for much of the night, the 4th line with Labrie, Crombeen, and Thompson was about the only line Tampa Bay had that was getting any forecheck. Thompson and Crombeen were also damned good on the PK, as well.

Radko Gudas was +1 with 1 shot, 4 hits, and 2 blocked shots in 22:45. He was a little tighter defensively than in the Boston game and continues to improve.

Tyler Johnson was 70% on draws in 15:03. The kid line was a little better than in Boston. They're still settling in, but they got more noticeable as a group in the Third Period. They need to be a little more poised when they try to pass the puck around, but they're getting there.

Alex Killorn was -1 with 2 penalty minutes and 3 shots in 17:22. I'm not sure he's a great fit for a line with Filppula and Purcell, because they're not exactly north-south guys and they don't share the puck easily. But, even with that impediment, Killorn was about the only guy getting pucks to the net through the first couple of periods.

Ondrej Palat had 1 blocked shot in 12:49. In the defensive third, he's been in good position and competent. From the Third Period in Boston through tonight, though, he's been too skittish in the other two zones. He needs to relax, because the past 4+ periods of hockey have been some of his worst with the puck that I've seen in the last 1-1/2 periods.

Andrej Sustr had 1 shot in 18:38. I'm happy to see him under 20 minutes with Salo back, and I'm enthralled to see him pass a pretty significant test by playing that many minutes against quality like Chicago can bring onto the ice.

Richard Panik played 10:53. Ho hum, right? Not exactly. He had a couple of key backchecks and actually created some chances that unfortunately got defused by blocked shots, but I thought he was significantly better than he was in Boston tonight.

Pierre-Cedric Labrie had 8 big hits in 8:46. You would have thought his skating would have been a bigger liability against Chicago than it was against Boston, but it wasn't. He and Thompson were the straws that stirred the drink on that 4th line.

Box score and extended statistics from

NHL Game Night: 10-3-13 Lightning at Bruins

Mixed bag in the opener.


Anders Lindback allowed 3 goals on 25 shots for the loss after earning the surprise start from Jon Cooper. Um, yeah, about that... when coach gives you a surprise nod, reward him. It's not that Lindback was overtly terrible and certainly you can't get too upset when the team in front of you gives up penalty shots. But, Lindback didn't step up and make the key saves you need in a tough game on the road, and his rebound control wasn't there tonight. In retrospect, you kind of wish Bishop was in there.

First Period
11:39 BOS Kelly (1), (unassisted)(SH)(PS)

Second Period
10:32 TB Filppula (1), (Brewer, Killorn)
19:00 BOS Lucic (1), (Krejci)

Third Period
04:02 BOS Bergeron (1), (unassisted)(SH)

It's never fun to open up a season with a loss, and I think this was a frustrating game overall. There were good signs and there were bad signs, and I think as long as the team builds up from this they're probably going to be ok. The good news is that, up until late in the Third Period when they came a little unglued, they had way more structure and poise defensively than at just about any point over the past 2 years. That put them in a position to steal points in a really bad road draw in a place the Lightning never win despite getting ordinary goaltending, losing a top pair defenseman to injury before the game (Salo), and throwing a whole lot of young players out against a veteran Boston club. Shorthanded breakdowns should be correctable, and this would have been a 1-1 tie without them if you look at silver linings. Holding Boston to 25 shots in their barn is a huge improvement and they kept scoring chances down pretty well, too.

The bad sign was that the Lightning's first line did next to nothing tonight. Only a couple of sporadic scoring chances and nothing sustained, and the golden 2-on-1 that Stamkos and St. Louis had and flubbed in the Second Period turned out, in retrospect, to be a turning point of the game. Point blank, they've got to be better. The second line isn't going to be as good this season no matter how many zeros are on Filppula's paycheck. Stamkos and St. Louis have to create scoring chances consistently and bring the bacon home. Have to. And, in general, there were only a couple of players on the Lightning I can say honestly played up to their full potential: Sustr and Labrie. That's about it. Everyone else can play a little better than they did tonight, which is a negative but also should tell them that there's considerable room to grow and get better, too.

This opening road trip is awful for the Lightning. The schedule makers could not have drawn up a worse script for the team. So, I wasn't expecting miracles right out of the gate. The key thing is to improve game to game, steal some wins here and there to get the positive reinforcement, and hang in there until December-January when I expect everything will really start to click.

Radko Gudas was -1 with 7 penalty minutes and 5 hits in 17:27. He got himself caught in no-man's land a couple of times coverage-wise in the Third Period, but the ill-advised pinches weren't there tonight like they were last season and the physical game you love was. So, modest improvement, but needs to be better still.

Mark Barberio was +1 with 1 shot in 16:26. The young man was a skating dumpster fire in the first half of the game. Made a terrible play that led to the shorthanded penalty shot and got absolutely undressed on a play where a quick referees whistle saved a goal that probably would've counted otherwise. The second half of the game he was less noticeable, which was an improvement, but when you make me long for Keith Aulie, we have problems.

Tyler Johnson was -2 with 3 shots, 1 blocked shot, and he was 61% on draws in 15:46. His line had small spurts throughout the game, but not the sustained level of play experienced in the preseason. I think they need to simplify and play more north-south next time out. Less curly-ques, please.

Alex Killorn had a helper and was +1 with 1 shot, 1 hit, and 2 blocked shots in 15:10. He can play a lot better. His line needs to earn puck possession more so he can have the chance to play his north-south game. He just didn't have the puck very much.

Ondrej Palat was -1 with 1 shot, 1 hit, and 1 blocked shot in 13:11. I thought he played his usual poised game until the Third Period when I saw him throw a puck away rather than calmly carry it to open ice, which is so unlike Palat it's jaw-dropping.

Andrej Sustr was -1 with 3 shots and 1 blocked shot in 20:03. I thought he played above his experience level. There were moments he was a little deer-legged skating-wise and got himself caught out of position, but he filled in well with Salo out. No way in hell do I want him playing 20 minutes a night at his age, and he's very likely to get hurt and worn out with a steady diet of that right now. But, for just tonight, fairly impressive outing.

Richard Panik was -2 with 3 hits and 1 blocked shot in 15:10. Of all the kids, other than maybe Barberio, I found his night the most disappointing. He botched the play that led to the second shorthanded goal against and, in general, he just seemed a step slow to the puck, soft when he got there, and that contributed to zero shots and no real scoring chances. Brother, if you want to be in the AHL real quick, keep that up. Brett Connolly is a phone call away.

Pierre-Cedric Labrie had 5 penalty minutes, 1 shot, 2 hits, and 1 blocked shot in 8:36. I thought he played his role fairly well tonight. He fought when he needed to and created a couple of chances with his size around the opposing net. He still can't skate a lick, so he's a defensive liability if he gets caught out on the ice so Cooper needs to be very conscious about that. But, in general, I thought he played his role and to his potential tonight, which is more than I can say for most of the team.

Box score and extended statistics from

2013 NHL Entry Draft Preview: Rounds One and Two

Here we are about 24 hours away from a pivotal draft in Lightning history, and I just wanted to post a few of my thoughts heading into the event. It's been a strange, strange week with the release of captain Vincent Lecavalier and the gesticulations of Joe Sakic and Patrick Roy for top pick holder Colorado. So, it's forced people looking at what the Lightning will do with their 3rd overall pick to re-evaluate what impact current events will have on the selection. In the end, I'm guessing very little.

Taking Colorado at their word, the top pick in tomorrow's draft will be Halifax centerman Nathan MacKinnon, who probably has the best straight line speed and shot of any player in this draft. He's very similar to the Lightning's Steven Stamkos or current Avs forward Matt Duchene with the added element that he likes to engage physically, sometimes to his detriment because he does have a propensity to get his clock cleaned every once in a while. Still, he's a player with the potential to become one of the top-10 goal scorers in the NHL. If the Lightning were to get MacKinnon, which looks like a very low likelihood now, it would give them the option to put a Grade A sniper on each of their top-2 lines, making it virtually impossible for opposing coaches to effectively line match against them. The same would be true with how the Lightning would be able to approach assembling their power play units. The Lightning would become the ultimate conundrum to defend.

But, that's probably not happening. MacKinnon likely goes off the board at the top pick leaving the Florida Panthers to choose between, probably, the next 3 top prospects in this draft: defenseman Seth Jones of Portland, left win Jonathan Drouin of Halifax, and center Aleksander Barkov of Tappara in the Finnish SM-liiga. My guess is Florida, already having center Jonathan Huberdeau in the fold, may not be considering Barkov quite as closely. You might argue a similar, roster-based approach when considering they have Erik Gudbranson and Dimitri Kulikov in the fold. That might make them willing to pass on Seth Jones, who was the consensus top pick up until the Memorial Cup Finals, in favor of Jonathan Drouin. But, I still think Florida is probably 70/30 likely to take Jones for the simple fact that, if you look at how current Panthers GM Dale Tallon constructed the Chicago Blackhawks, he's a man who understands the need for depth on defense. When you consider the Hawks have won 2 Cups in 4 years with goaltenders who aren't the ilk of the Patrick Roys or Martin Brodeurs of the world, a lot of credit has to go to guys like Duncan Keith, Brent Seabrook, Niklas Hjalmarsson, Nick Leddy, and the veterans that have been put around them. But it's not a certainty, so lets consider the Lightning's options:

D Seth Jones, 6'4" 208 lbs, Portland (WHL)
Jones is the son of former NBA player Popeye Jones, and has a level of athleticism that makes it easy to project him as a 15-20 year NHL stalwart. He's got decent size, strength, and supreme mobility. He's also the coveted righty shot, which is something the Lightning organization needs. He does almost all the intangible things you want from a defenseman in terms of puck protection, decision making, and his first pass out of the zone ability. He's probably in the same class as current Lightning defenseman Victor Hedman in terms of how you should slot him as a potential, long-term #1/#2 defenseman in the league with the knock being, like Hedman, that Jones doesn't always engage in the physical game. He was the top prospect for this draft almost wire to wire until the Memorial Cup Finals when Halifax strafed the Winterhawks, and I think were he to drop to the Lightning they'd be hard pressed to pass on him. Championships are won from the blueline out, and the opportunity to add Jones to what little the team does have between Hedman and Radko Gudas is probably too good to pass up. Steve Yzerman would solidify the future of at least half of his blueline corps for the future and could shift his strategy on the blueline to finding players to bridge the next 1-3 years, possibly with a handful of grizzled veterans available at a cheaper price in the post-compliance buy-out era. With all that said, and as much sense as that all makes, Jones may not be the best player available when the Lightning pick at 3.

LW Jonathan Drouin, 5'11" 185 lbs, Halifax (QMJHL)
The best player in this draft may be Jonathan Drouin, who may not have all the measurables of a MacKinnon or Jones, but pop in a tape of his play and you'll begin to drool uncontrollably. There's a game we play every summer where scouts give their stock comparisons of player X to a current or former NHLer. So, if it's a really tall defenseman, here come the Chara or Myers comparisons. For a long time it was fashionable to compare power forwards to Cam Neely. Etc, etc. These are safe, accepted comparisons for scouts to make, and a few of those have been made in comparing Drouin to the likes of Patrick Kane or Claude Giroux. But, your ears should perk up when he is also compared to NHL legends like Gilbert Perrault and Denis Savard. Scouts don't like to walk the plank like that and utter the names of legendary, revered players unless a prospect truly has a special "it". Drouin may have that. He's a good, but not great straight line player, but what begins to set him apart is his lateral mobility. There hasn't been a player with nearly the amount of wiggle in Drouin's game to come out in a long, long time. He can stop on a dime and move 2-3 strides to the left or right in a blink and his puckhandling ability is world-class, often looking like he has the puck tied to his blade with a string. That's one way Jonathan Drouin can kill you. He's also got Brad Richards-like vision, hockey sense, and passing ability making him one of the best playmakers to come out in quite some time too. And, oh by the way, he's a heckuva goal scorer to boot. More than that, Drouin's known to be one of the fiercest competitors in the junior hockey world today. He hates to lose and although he's not the type to physically bludgeon you, he will risk life and limb in high traffic areas to make a play to win games (and much like Marty St. Louis, is smart and quick enough to get in and out with out having to actually sacrifice life and limb). With the exit of Lecavalier and the age of St. Louis, the added intangible of Drouin's compete-level may be a critical consideration in setting the culture for the next generation of the Tampa Bay Lightning.

C Aleksander Barkov, 6'3" 209 lbs, Tappara (FIN)
Here's the safest pick in the draft. Barkov's father was a Russian hockey player who settled in Finland where Barkov grew up and plays in the country's top league and is one of its leading scorers despite his young age. He's just a good, all around hockey player with good size, skill, hockey sense, and above average defensive abilities for a young forward. He's been compared, a lot, to Anaheim' Ryan Getzlaf and Minnesota's Mikko Koivu and he seems to be moving up late in the draft process, probably due to positive news teams are getting regarding the shoulder injury Barkov suffered late this season. For a team with a gaping hole at center with Lecavalier's departure, this might seem a little too good to be true. But, fans should recognize that it's unfair to expect a player like Barkov to fill someone like Lecavalier's shoes at 18 years old, and the Lightning should look at whether their needs at center will be this pronounced 3 years down the line once Barkov begins to truly come into his own. I would argue they won't be because I expect Vladislav Namestnikov to continue to develop along the same rapid decent we saw in the AHL playoffs. Along with Stamkos, Namestnikov could fill the Lightning's top two center spots in 3 years, making a center like Barkov less valuable to the team. All that may be a moot point anyway if rumors are true that the Nashville Predators are so enamored with Barkov they may swap picks with Florida to move up to the 2nd pick to get him. I'd be ok with that, because the choice between Jones and Drouin would be a #goodproblemtohave.

RW Valeri Nichushkin, 6'4" 196 lbs, Chelyabinsk (RUS)
Here's the wildest of wild cards: Traktor Chelyabinsk power forward Valeri Nichushkin. On his best days he looks every bit like Alexander Ovechkin or Evgeni Malkin, and he string together two weeks of his best days in an early 2013 tournament that darned near shot him up to #1 on many scouts' lists. Since then, though, he's failed to sustain quite that level of dominance. He had a good but not sparking KHL regular season and playoffs as Chelyabinsk eventually fell in the Gagarin Cup Finals, and he had a good but not sparkling U18 World Junior Championships where he showed flashes but eventually wound up third on Team Russia in scoring for the tournament. He's big, strong as an ox, handles and protects the puck well, and has a sharp, quick release. Hockey sense may be a question as he likes to often go it alone and carry the puck rather than give and receive a pass from his linemates. But, the allure is there and reportedly the Lightning do have a bit of an affinity for Nichushkin. He might be the perfect linemate to Namestnikov and Nikita Kucherov 3 years down the line, and I suspect he'd have been the pick if the Lightning were sitting at 4th or 5th. At 3rd, though, I'm not sure he is in any way, shape, or fashion the best player available and those peddling Malkin comparisons would be wise to look back and see what Malkin was doing at the same age: dominating U20 World Junior Championships, not finishing 3rd on Team Russia at the U18's. Compounding matters for Nichushkin is the Russian Factor, which may be a legitimate concern this time around given pre-draft contractual maneuvering between notorious agent Mark Gandler (see, Alexei Yashin, Evgeny Artyukhin, and just about every other Russian player who has enraged an NHL team with contract messes) and Moscow Dynamo, who acquired Nichushkin's rights for a boatload of rubles. Dynamo supposedly will allow Nichushkin to go to the NHL with no entanglements, but they won't allow him to go to the AHL, which is a league Nichushkin has said he has no interest in playing in. I smell a bit of a prima donna in that whole arrangement, which might be ok from a more finished product, but there are aspects to Valeri's game that need more development. That development would ideally take place in Syracuse alongside Namestnikov and Kucherov, giving the Lightning the opportunity to groom them together as a unit for 1 season before bringing them up to Tampa Bay. If that's not an option though, I'm less sold on the whole Nichushkin experiment.

Beyond the first round, the Lightning also hold the 3rd pick in the 2nd round, 33rd overall, which in a deep draft like this should yield an NHL player. A wide range of possibilities exist for the pick, but lets narrow them down with some assumptions. Lets play the odds and say Colorado takes MacKinnon and Florida takes Jones, leaving the Lightning to select either Drouin or Barkov (presuming Steve Yzerman elects not to give me nightmares by selecting Nichushkin). In the event the Lightning don't get Jones, they're almost compelled to take a defenseman at 33rd overall. Preferably, they'd get a righty shot, 2-way guy with some edge to play more of the physical style Jon Cooper is trying to install in his quest to make the Lightning harder to play against. So, let's consider what the options might be:

D Steve Santini, 6'2" 205 lbs, USNTDP (USHL)
If he somehow lasts to 33, I view Santini as the ideal fit for the Lightning's needs. He's got decent size, excellent poise and positioning, and he's nasty around his crease. He's a good passer and decent puck carrier, too, and protects the puck like the Secret Service protects the president. I'd be shocked if he slipped to 33, but a lot of mock drafts I see have Santini going in the 2nd round. If he's there, the Lightning may need to pounce.

D Tom Vannelli, 6'2" 170 lbs, Minnetonka (USHS)
U.S. high school star Tom Vannelli is extremelyy raw but has a ton of upside for a team looking for a righty shot, tempo-pushing defenseman. He's got excellent skating ability, loves to carry the puck, and is a solid passer and puck distributor. He's a bit of a greyhound though and needs to bulk up to compete as he begins to move up against higher levels of competition. He probably doesn't have the nasty streak Santini has, but he does look like a guy who can develop into a minutes-chomping two-way defender in the NHL.

D Shea Theodore, 6'2" 182 lbs, Seattle (WHL)
He's not a righty, but Shea Theodore is an offensive defenseman who may still catch the Lightning's eye. His game is very comparable to Vanneli's with the exception that Theodore's defensive positioning is probably more advanced at this stage. He does need to bulk up and he's not a bone cruncher, but he's one of the best power play quarterbacks in this draft and those are never bad to have around.

D Madison Bowey, 6'1" 201 lbs, Kelowna (WHL)
There's a wide disparity of opinion about where righty defenseman Madison Bowey will go in Sunday's draft, but there's not a wide disparity of opinion about his game. This is one of the best skating defensemen in this draft, but unlike Vannelli or Theodore he uses that ability more in the defensive third as more of a shutdown defender. That's been to the chagrin of many scouts who see Bowey has a cannon shot and good skill but possibly lacks the confidence and offensive hockey sense to use them at this stage in his career. There's also probably some concern about Bowey's mediocre-sized frame. No, he's not a dwarf, but he's a shade smaller than the NHL ideal. So, it's a glass half empty/half full proposition. Do you view Bowey as a guy who already does well at elements of his game that are typically harder for an 18 year old to excel at and assume the offense will come around? Or, do you worry the things he's good at now might not translate well to the league against bigger, stronger men and that his offense will never come around? If you're in the former camp, Bowey's a first rounder. If you're in the latter, Bowey may be around to take at 33.

D Robert Hagg, 6'2" 204 lbs, MODO (SWE)
Here's a riddle wrapped in an enigma. Athletically, many argue Hagg should be a first rounder and THN has him as high as the 12th best prospect in the draft. But, he's wildly inconsistent to the point that many teams may stay off of him until the second round. He's got most everything you want from a defenseman. He's got good size and strength and will engage in the physical game. He's got one of the hardest shots in this draft and distributes the puck well. And, he's got excellent straight line speed. Where he lacks is in his focus, which leads to poor decision-making on when to jump into plays and he may have some tightness in his lateral skating and pivots which lead to poor gap control and getting beat wide too much. He's a lefty, which is another minor scratch against him, but he does come out of the same program as Victor Hedman so, do the Lightning roll the dice if Hagg falls that far?

D Ian McCoshen, 6'2" 207 lbs, Waterloo (USHL)
A lot of mocks have McCoshen going in the late 1st round, and he's a lefty, but a lot of his game would appear to be a good fit for the Lightning. Like Santini, he's going to Boston College next year, and he's doing so with the reputation of being a solid stay-at-home defenseman who plays with some edge. He does possess a big shot and some puck distributing savvy on the PP, but that may not be his game in the NHL. But, with that aside, to me there's nothing wrong with a minute-eating 20 point a year type guy if he can help shut down the opposition's scoring lines and shows some edge to protect around his crease.

Other options certainly exist for that pick, but there's six names to look for in the second half of the first round tomorrow as, hopefully, a couple of them survive to the Lightning's pick at 33rd overall. With any luck, I suspect the Lightning may have a franchise forward and future top-4 defenseman when the dust clears.

AHL Calder Cup Finals Game Night: 6-18-13 Griffins at Crunch

All good things...


Grand Rapids Wins the Series 4-2
Grand Rapids Wins the Calder Cup

Cedrick Desjardins allowed 3 goals on 23 shots in a game that encapsulated the Finals for Desjardins. Brilliant at times, he allowed a goal through him on the eventual game winner by Evans that he surely wishes he had back. It will be interesting to see how Julien BriseBois retools between the pipes for next season, because you can make the argument the difference between Desjardins and Mrazek was, in large part, the difference between champion and runner-up.

First Period
SYR Panik, (9) (Taormina, Palat), 17:15

Second Period
GR Callahan, (6) (Ferraro, Grant), 2:23
GR Tatar, (15) (Nyquist, Ferraro), 12:41 (PP)

Third Period
SYR Sustr, (2) (Namestnikov, Devos), 5:14
GR Evans, (2) (Callahan, Sheahan), 9:54
GR Tatar, (16) (Andersson, Nyquist), 19:11 (EN/PP)
GR Andersson, (3) (Glendening), 19:54 (EN)

I think Lightning fans everywhere, even with the bitterness of this defeat, need to start by saying, "thank you" to this group of players. The team we've referred to as "SyraNo" on this site, which won a championship in Norfolk last year and almost did again this year with Syracuse has been one of the best groups of players ever to take the ice together in the AHL. A lot of these guys, like Radko Gudas who returned tonight from injury, are ticketed for the NHL next year. Others, some of the really veteran guys, may move on in the offseason. So, this group of guys will never be together again, but we should tip our hat to them for two years of sustained brilliance the likes of which we're unlikely to see again anytime soon.

As for the young prospects who will likely return to Syracuse next season, I found myself highly impressed with Vladislav Namestnikov and Andrej Sustr, both of whom got stronger as the playoffs wore on. Namestnikov is a legit threat to be an AHL All-Star next season, if not more, with his wizardry with the puck and Sustr is something rare and interesting in pro hockey. You have to put aside the fact Andrej is 6'8", because he refuses to play to type. He's not a bone crunching stay-at-homer, and there's a lot of times he looks like a forward with his ability to read the play offensively and jump into the action. His feed to Tyler Johnson in the slot in the Third Period tonight was an incredible bit of vision that I think stunned TJ a bit, and darned near got Syracuse the key goal they needed in the final frame. That's after he tied the game once in the final period with an absolute bullet from the point. These two guys will be fun to watch develop next season.

Ondrej Palat finishes the playoffs as the AHL leader in postseason scoring. Well done, Mr. Palat.

Box score from

AHL Calder Cup Finals Game Night: 6-9-13 Griffins at Crunch



Grand Rapids Leads the Series 2-0

Cedrick Desjardins allowed 6 goals on 29 shots for the loss. I don't care how you spin that. That's an ugly stat line. Desjardins suffered tonight from going long stretches without seeing any shots and then suddenly having to face a 10 bell scoring chance, like Mursak's game sealing breakaway.

First Period
GR Tatar, (12) (Evans, Nyquist), 4:29
GR Grant, (1) (Ferraro), 11:31
SYR Sustr, (1) (Taormina, Paradis), 14:03

Second Period
GR Ferraro, (5) (Hoggan, Sheahan), 6:23
SYR Panik, (5) (Connolly, Johnson), 10:06 (PP)
GR Jurco, (8) (Sheahan), 12:09 (PP)
SYR Connolly, (4) (Johnson, Palat), 16:12 (PP)
SYR Brown, (4) (Wyman), 18:23
GR Pare, (3) (Ferraro, Paetsch), 18:49 (PP)

Third Period
GR Mursak, (9) (Hoggan, Paetsch), 14:56

Brett Connolly was the game's third star.

I think these past two games put an exclamation mark on the impact Radko Gudas being absent from the lineup hurts the Syracuse Crunch. They're not giving up huge amounts of zone time or shots, but the number of odd man rushes is out of control, and the team misses its best defenseman. Clearly.

The AHL's top officials should seriously consider whether they want the players or the referees to decide their champion. The degree to which the referees have had an impact so far in this serious has been stunning for a professional league.

Now these players have to decide how much their legacy means to them. A comeback victory against the odds with 3 in a row in Grand Rapids would only add to this group's legend as one of the best assemblages of players in AHL history. Going out with a whimper makes the team look more like a one year, Norfolk wonder. They've worked too hard, I think, to let it go down like that, though. Game Three is Wednesday.

Box score from

AHL Calder Cup Finals Game Night: 6-8-13 Griffins at Crunch

Long layoff, shaky goal, Mrazek, and the refs cost Syracuse Game One.


Grand Rapids leads the series 1-0

Cedrick Desjardins allowed 2 goals on 20 shots for the loss. He's a bit infuriating. He was pretty well excellent throughout the game making several big stops along the way, but the eventual game winner was a long slapshot that he allowed to go through him that you simply cannot surrender in a 1-0 game in the Third Period. So frustrating.

First Period
GR Callahan, (5) (Billins, Evans), 6:45

Second Period

Third Period
GR Sheahan, (3) (Mursak), 12:00
SYR Cote, (1) (Angelidis, Brown), 13:19
GR Nyquist, (2) (Andersson), 19:45 (EN/PP)

Ondrej Palat was the game's third star. There's little doubt he was the straw that stirred the drink on the reformed PTP line tonight with Richard Panik back in the lineup. They got a fair number of scoring chances, but Petr Mrazek is a damned good goaltender. The Crunch definitely learned that tonight.

Also helping Mrazek out was that Syracuse showed just a bit of rust from their long layoff. In the first half of the game it seemed their short to mid-range passes were just a shade off of clicking, and it really allowed Grand Rapids to keep Syracuse away from the kind of zone time domination the Crunch thrive off of. They've got to find a way to better establish their forecheck headed into Game Two.

Beyond that, it should be noted that the refs waved off a goal in the match on a power play in the Second Period that should have tied the game on a crease violation where the replay showed no real contact with Mrazek. Between that and an interference penalty that went uncalled late in the Third Period right before Panik took a call that essentially ended the contest, the refs influence on the game could hardly be underestimated. Again, frustrating, and I think the wave off of the goal definitely deflated Syracuse for the rest of the Second and on into the early Third Period.

So, now Syracuse falls behind the 8-ball with Grand Rapids stealing home ice and playing with house money in Game Two. Hopefully Syracuse will get Radko Gudas back for the contest, because the thought of being down 0-2 before heading west is beyond unappealing.

Box score from

AHL Playoff Game Night: 6-1-13 Penguins at Crunch

Syracuse's 4th liners help put up a touchdown on the Penguins.


Syracuse Wins the Series 4-1
Syracuse Win the Eastern Conference Championship

Cedrick Desjardins stopped all 22 shots he faced for the shutout victory. He was the player of the series, in my opinion. By stealing Game Three, a game where the Crunch played their worst hockey, he really put the Pens behind the eight ball and tonight was the finishing touch.

First Period
SYR Namestnikov, (2) (Sustr, Johnson), 16:04
SYR Gudas, (2) (Brown, Wyman), 16:56

Second Period
SYR Paradis, (1) (Barberio, Sustr), 13:37
SYR Sexton, (4) (Devos), 15:31
SYR Palat, (5) (Sexton, Barberio), 17:58 (PP)

Third Period
SYR Paradis, (2) (Sustr), 1:02
SYR Paradis, (3) (Sexton, Barberio), 5:43

Phillipe Paradis, Desjardins, and Dan Sexton were the game's three stars. Best line of the night? It was Syracuse's extra forwards Paradis and Cedric Paquette (whom I have dubbed "Dump Truck" for his fleet skating ability and work rate). With the Crunch up 2-0 at the end of the First Period, they seemed to take their foot off the gas the first 5 minutes of the Second Period. It looked like the Pens would make a game of it until the 4th liners came in and started to get zone time and turn the momentum back to Syracuse. They never looked back, and Paradis eventually ran up a hat trick for the ages. None of the goals were cheapies, either. Paradis has a surprisingly good shot and absolutely took Zatkoff to school on each one.

Another highlight? Dmitry Korobov beating the tar out of Paul Thompson. You know Thompson thought he was picking a winnable opponent going up against a Belarussian. Wrong. Korobov beat him like he stole a mortgage payment worth of money from him. Remind me never to get Dmitry Korobov mad at me. He rained fists down on the top of Thompson's head with tropical storm force. Wow.

Radko Gudas sat out the Third Period with what appeared to be a lower body bruise. Richard Panik again sat out of the lineup (making room for Dump Truck), but he was in the morning skate and one would assume he will be available in the next series. Grand Rapids looks to be on the way to winning tonight's game against Oklahoma City, which would knot that series up at 2-2. That means it could be half a week before the Crunch know who their Calder Cup Finals opponent is, and you hope it's a week where Grand Rapids and Oklahoma City beat the daylights out of each other while Syracuse heals. Whichever opponent makes it out of the West, Syracuse will have home ice to begin the series, so they've done just about everything they need to strategically to set themselves up to try to collect another title.

Box score from

Bolts Extend Gudas

TAMPA BAY – The Tampa Bay Lightning have signed defenseman Radko Gudas to a three-year contract, vice president and general manager Steve Yzerman announced today.

Gudas, 22, played in 22 games with the Lightning this past season, collecting two goals and five points to go along with a plus-3 rating and 38 penalty minutes. He made his NHL debut on March 12 at Florida and scored his first career NHL goal on March 20 at Toronto. Gudas ranked seventh in the NHL among rookies with 87 hits despite playing in only 22 games during the 2012-13 regular season.

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